Category Archives: New Trends in Jewish Feminism

Orthodox Feminism and the Next Century

general
January 1, 2000

Blu Greenberg On numerous occasions over the past years, I’ve been asked: how far can Orthodoxy go in re-sponding to feminism? Sometimes there’s a bit of goading behind the question: What do Orthodox feminists really want? What’s your real agenda? But often the questioner comes with genuine interest. How far can Orthodoxy accommodate the needs More »

Questions for an Unfinished Revolution

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January 1, 2000

Tamara Cohen I didn’t attend the First National Jewish Women’s Conference in New York in 1973. My mother wanted to bring me, her two year-old daughter, but the conference organizers asked her to either stay home with her baby or attend the conference alone. Although she resented the choice, she went to the conference without More »

Women Writing a Sefer Torah

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January 1, 2000

Shoshana Gugenheim Every Israelite is commanded to write for themselves a scroll of the Torah for their own use, as it says: “Now therefore write for yourself this Song.” (Deuteronomy 31:19) I remember when I consciously became part of collective memory. I recall the moment when my ancestral memory and my present memory were wed, More »

Assuming the Privileges of Patriarchy

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January 1, 2000

Lori Hope Lefkovitz Shoshana Gugenheim’s vision of children watching their mothers write a Torah scroll is a moving one, and women reclaiming Torah through sofrut has barrier-breaking power: the first woman surgeon, rabbi, and now . . . scribe. Adding this role to women’s options represents another step towards women’s access to all positions of More »

Jewish Feminist Visions

general
January 1, 2000

Sh’ma asked several Jewish professionals and lay leaders to comment on how feminism will transform Judaism in the next decade, and to name the questions we should be asking. Most Jewish feminists are no longer asking “What” or “Why” questions. We know what’s wrong and why and we’re sick and tired of having to restate More »