Author Archives: Rabbi Josh Snyder

Rabbi Josh Snyder

About Rabbi Josh Snyder

is the Executive Director of Goucher College Hillel in Baltimore, MD. He attended List College's Joint Program between Columbia University and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America where he earned degrees in Talmud and Biology. After a brief adventure as a veterinary student, Josh was ordained at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in 2008. In addition to immersing himself in Hillel, Josh finds balance through his wife Neely and three daughters, distance running, rock music, the Seattle Seahawks and Baltimore Orioles.

Frustration Breeds Community (Song)

Rabbi Josh Snyder
June 1, 2014

Back in November, I wrote about being inspired by a localized community in Bermuda. In February, I wrote about my own search for community. This song is a light-hearted, tongue-in-cheek take on the unending quandary of defining what community and neighborhood really mean in the ultra-customized, internet-driven age.   I just wish I could find More »

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Nay Nay Nay and Thou

Rabbi Josh Snyder
May 19, 2014

As you read this, do me a favor and press play here. Don’t worry, no instruments here, just a capella, so it’s omer friendly. There, now you’re listening to a niggun (wordless) melody I wrote. Treat it as integral or as background noise, just let it be part of the experience. First of all, let More »

On the Other Side (Song)

Rabbi Josh Snyder
October 31, 2013

After a few attempts, this song found its inspiration in a piece by master glass artist and Baltimorean Gianni Toso.  The piece, called “Birthright”, shows the kotel on two sides: one, with a more traditionally-dressed crowd in gender-separate reverence before the kotel, and the other with mixed dancing of Taglit-Birthright Israel participants in shorts and More »

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What’s Your Avodah? (Song)

Rabbi Josh Snyder
September 22, 2013

As I read through this month’s Shma, I was entranced by a thought expressed in Sharon Cohen Anisfeld’s piece “Rabbinic Calling: Our Work”.  Sharon expresses initial reluctance to own the sense of ‘calling’ often claimed by Christian clergy, but finds rich grounding in the concept of shlichut (mission), and ultimately that work as rabbis can More »

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