Author Archives: Dr. Gail Labovitz

Dr. Gail Labovitz

About Dr. Gail Labovitz

is Associate Professor of Rabbinic Literature at the American Jewish University, where she teaches primarily for the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, and is also an ordained Conservative rabbi. She is the author of a number of scholarly articles, and the book Marriage and Metaphor: Constructions of Gender in Rabbinic Literature. She has also worked as a Senior Research Analyst for the Feminist Sexual Ethics Project at Brandeis University, and the coordinator of the Jewish Feminist Research Group for the Women's Studies Program at the Jewish Theological Seminary.

Among Those in the Room…

Dr. Gail Labovitz
April 10, 2013

I am a Jew by birth and actually do feel that even in the modern era of fluid and optional identities, being Jewish is something more than a choice for me.  Moreover, my Jewish identity is more than religious; it is an identity that is ethnic and cultural.  It is true that I have made More »

0

The Wall and my Daughter’s Wall

Dr. Gail Labovitz
December 26, 2012

Sitting in my e-mail in-box, as I sit to write this over Thanksgiving weekend, is an e-mail from the Board of Rabbis of Southern California, including an announcement of a program at a nearby synagogue.  The title of the program is “Women at the Wall: Prayer or Provocation?”  The write-up the event includes this statement: More »

0

If You Build It, They Will Come: Who Are ‘You’ vs. What Is ‘It’

Dr. Gail Labovitz
October 23, 2012

What I noticed reading the draft of the current Sh’ma is that the issue is quite top-heavy with rabbis first and foremost, with a strong representation of academics and leaders of community organizations close behind.  Who is rather noticeably missing from this conversation?  Lay people, synagogue members, indie minyan members, unaffiliated Jews.  Imagine a round-table More »

0

Justice and Mercy… and Truth

Dr. Gail Labovitz
September 9, 2012

How can one not be intrigued by a book of the Bible whose last words are “and many cattle”? There is much to be said about the short, but complex, confounding book of Jonah. Each of the contributors to the current issue of Sh’ma has already given us much to think about, added to our More »

0